Good Reads Wednesday

jeff-smby Jeff Miller of Artisan Family of Wines (Seven Artisans, Sly Dog Cellars, Red Côte)

Every Wednesday I post my recommendations of the best of last week’s postings concerning wine, whether blogs or news. I list them in the order I read them, so you shouldn’t infer anything about the order in which I list these posts.

The Five Most Difficult Things about Judging Wine Competitions

Fermentation

http://fermentationwineblog.com/2014/05/five-difficult-things-judging-wine-competitions/

Putting aside the fact that wine competitions are pretty useless in every conceivable way (except that they are kind of fun), this lays out five of the more difficult aspects of wine judging.

Whole Foods: The canary in the coal mine?

Steve Heimoff

http://www.steveheimoff.com/index.php/2014/05/09/whole-foods-the-canary-in-the-coal-mine/

The back story to this article is pretty interesting. Whole Foods saw its share price plummet on less than spectacular sales and earnings reports. Heimoff posits that this is because the consumer is figuring out that they can get equivalent quality without paying Whole Foods prices. Can much the same thing can happen with wine?

Tuesday twaddle: geographic indicators, and the changing seasons

Steve Heimoff

http://www.steveheimoff.com/index.php/2014/05/06/tuesday-twaddle-geographic-indicators-and-the-changing-seasons/

In the law, there comes a point where it products proper name become so identified with the generic product itself that it loses uniqueness in the mind of the consumer, and then protection in the eyes of the law. Kleenex is an excellent example. It is a difficult problem because there is no bright line between the two. The same is true with wine. This battle is getting played out yet again in negotiations over trade policy.

Why do people buy wine?

Steve Heimoff

http://www.steveheimoff.com/index.php/2014/05/05/why-do-people-buy-wine/

I could not agree with Heimoff more when he says that people will pay more for a Lafite, damn whether it is actually any better than a myriad of other, cheaper, wines. Whether you think that is a good thing or not, it is a fact of life that you simply cannot wish away. But I cannot disagree with him more when he seeks to justify that. To me, it is really a triumph of marketing over winemaking.

The Good Doctor L

Two Dogs, a Flamingo and a Bottle of Wine

http://dogswine.blogspot.com/2014/05/the-good-doctor-l.html

It continues to boggle my mind that with so much mediocre wine out there German Rieslings do not do much better in the marketplace than they do.

A wine tasting experience ~ elitism can sneak in and ruin a good glass of wine

Wine Blog

http://www.wine-blog.org/index.php/2014/05/09/wine-tasting-experience-elitism-can-sneaks-ruin-good-glass-wine/

I always appreciate it when someone who knows what they are talking about recognizes that each of us has a palate that is unique unto ourselves.

This week in wine fraud

Dr. Vino

http://www.drvino.com/2014/05/09/week-wine-fraud/

I don’t know if this post accurately betrays what Rudy Kurniawan is arguing in mitigation of his wine fraud, but, if it is, this has to be about the dumbest way possible to throw yourself on the mercy of the court.

Wine will kill you — or not

The Wine Curmudgeon

http://winecurmudgeon.com/wine-will-kill-you-or-not/

As noted here, there is little doubt that the plethora of information on the benefits or detriments of alcohol consumption could hardly be more confusing.

For keeping up to date with what’s going on the in wine world, the best all around source is http://winebusiness.com.

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