Good Reads Wednesday

jeff-smby Jeff Miller of Artisan Family of Wines (Seven Artisans, Sly Dog Cellars, Red Côte)

Every Wednesday I post my recommendations of the best of last week’s postings concerning wine, whether blogs or news. I list them in the order I read them, so you shouldn’t infer anything about the order in which I list these posts.

Millennials spend on the media? Really? Wow.

Steve Heimoff

http://www.steveheimoff.com/index.php/2014/04/11/how-much-time-did-you-say-millennials-spend-on-the-media-really-wow/

“The most stunning finding from Ipsos Media’s new study on social media is that Millennials spend an average of 17.8 hours a day perusing (if that’s the right word) the media.”

Am I misreading something or what, but if I reading this correctly it can’t possibly be correct. But even if it’s off by quite a bit, it’s kind of mind-boggling for someone of my age to realize how much time younger people spend on social media.

The difference between marketing and PR

Wine Blog

http://www.wine-blog.org/index.php/2014/04/11/difference-marketing-pr/

This is a pretty interesting discussion about how the marketing and public relations departments fit together in a wine company much larger than anything I’ve ever been involved in.

What to wear in wine country

Wine Blog

http://www.wine-blog.org/index.php/2014/04/09/wear-wine-country/

I thought this was a little humorous in that the first picture of what to wear in wine country was a woman in a white blouse. The first rule of being in a winery is to wear only dark colors so that when you douse yourself with a red wine (as you invariably will) you still look okay, and save the cost of the ruined white garment to boot.

Kosher Wine and the Mevushal Process

Tom Mansell

http://palatepress.com/2014/04/wine/kosher-wine-mevushal-process/

Being Jewish myself, I feel I have a free pass to criticize my co-religionists. This whole Mevushal process is nuts. I always thought it was nuts, but if I ever had any doubts (which I never had) this post certainly put them to rest. To summarize: The Mevushal process involves heating the wine to what used to be boiling, but is now a little bit less. Why do this? For two reasons. First, to make the wine inferior (so that idolaters would never use it for their religious rights which has to be the first thing that I’ve ever heard of that warranted giving kudos to idolaters). And second, to remove any taint from its ever having been touched by a non-Jew. It strikes me as particularly galling that a group (my group at that) that has been at the forefront of the development of much of modern thinking feels itself justified in resorting to some of the most backward tribal practices.

The Israeli Wine Industry, a 4 Millennium Old Toddler

David Honig

http://palatepress.com/2014/04/wine/israeli-wine-industry-4-millennium-old-toddler/

Here’s the second post with a Jewish slant (I assume this plethora of Jewish related arguments is because Passover is coming up soon). At any rate, it does contain quite a bit of interesting information concerning the Israeli wine industry. One interesting quote:

“Fortunately, one of the newer trends in the country is for wineries to start experimenting with different varietals, in search of a grape that might someday be associated with Israeli wine, much like sauvignon blanc is associated with New Zealand and malbec is linked with Argentina.”

For what it’s worth, my vote is for Carignan, which based upon my somewhat limited experience just seems to produce incredibly good wines in Israel.

Should critics allow personal style preferences to influence their work?

jamie goode’s wine blog

http://www.wineanorak.com/wineblog/uncategorized/should-critics-allow-personal-style-preferences-to-influence-their-work

It’s always interesting to realize that there are people in this world whose views are so different than your own (how can they be so incorrect?). I believe how much someone likes a particular wine is such a personal, subjective thing that I can hardly believe that there are people who feel differently. But obviously there are. The thinking seems to be that even though this wine is quite awful, it’s quite awful in the way it’s supposed to be quite awful. I guess I can kind of follow the logic there, but I have no clue how to turn that theory into practice.

For keeping up to date with what’s going on the in wine world, the best all around source is http://winebusiness.com.

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