Good Reads Wednesday

jeff-smby Jeff Miller of Artisan Family of Wines (Seven Artisans, Sly Dog Cellars, Red Côte)

Every Wednesday I post my recommendations of the best of last week’s postings concerning wine, whether blogs or news. I list them in the order I read them, so you shouldn’t infer anything about the order in which I list these posts.

Checking On Some Older CA Pinot Noir

VINOGRAPHY: a wine blog

http://www.vinography.com/archives/2014/03/checking_in_on_some_older_ca_p.html

I thought this post was particularly apropos considering that I did a similar post several weeks ago concerning a Joseph Swan California Pinot Noir. I would disagree with Alder about the general age worthiness of California Pinot Noirs in particular, and California reds in general. I don’t think they really age, again as a general matter, as well as European wines. But I think that has more to do with how farmers grow the grapes, and particularly when they harvest them, and how winemakers choose to process them, than from any inherent differences between the old and new worlds.

Some thoughts from a recovering wine critic

Steve Heimoff

http://www.steveheimoff.com/index.php/2014/03/27/some-thoughts-from-a-recovering-wine-critic/

More on the hundred point system which I discussed in my Monday post.

How do you consider the three-tier system in the wine world of the US to be functioning?

Wine Blog

http://www.wine-blog.org/index.php/2014/03/25/considering-three-tier-system-wine-word-us-functioning/

You can spend a lot of time reading about the three-tier system for wine marketing in this country, but this simple post pretty much says it all. The bottom line: everything is stacked in favor of the big guys.

Batali and Bastianich group threatened with suspension

Dr. Vino

http://www.drvino.com/2014/03/20/batali-bastianich-group-wine-suspension/

Eataly wined and fined & the three-tier system

Dr. Vino

http://www.drvino.com/2014/03/26/eataly-wined-fined-three-tier-system/#more-13663

The prior post addressed the downsides in general of the three-tier system. These two posts concern one company (or more accurately a group of interrelated companies) in New York that has run afoul of the system. It doesn’t seem particularly “evil” to me that someone who has restaurants and a wine store should decide to start producing wine and then sell it through his own outlets. But New York State feels differently. You can understand historically how these rules evolved. But they really and clearly don’t serve any purpose in 2014 except, perhaps, from the point of view of those who benefit from the rules which in effect limit competition.

Nielsen’s Emerging Trends In Beverage Alcohol 2014 (“Wine Is Winning”)

1 Wine Dude

http://www.1winedude.com/nielsen-emerging-trends-in-beverage-alcohol-2014/#more-13153

This is an interesting potpourri of facts, or perhaps more accurately described as near facts, concerning the alcohol industry. While not perfect, it certainly better than the total mis-information that is common, and widely accepted as true despite the complete lack of any effort to verify anything.

Are Standing Tasting Bars Better than Seated?

SVB on Wine

http://svbwine.blogspot.com/2014/03/are-standing-tasting-bars-better-than.html#more

I’m kind of surprised that according to the Silicon Valley Bank survey, tasting rooms where the server is seated do better than those where they stand. I guess I’m even more surprised that anyone would ask the question.

For keeping up to date with what’s going on the in wine world, the best all around source is http://winebusiness.com.

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