Archive for the ‘Good Reads’ Category

Good Reads Wednesday

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

jeff-smby Jeff Miller of Artisan Family of Wines (Seven Artisans, Sly Dog Cellars, Red Côte)

Every Wednesday I post my recommendations of the best of last week’s postings concerning wine, whether blogs or news. I list them in the order I read them, so you shouldn’t infer anything about the order in which I list these posts.

What it Takes to Grow the Direct To Consumer Wine Channel

Fermentation

http://fermentationwineblog.com/2014/07/takes-grow-direct-consumer-wine-channel/

Wark’s suggestions on what would really help direct to consumer sales.

Terroir vs. personal preference: the critic’s dilemma?

Steve Heimoff

http://www.steveheimoff.com/index.php/2014/07/15/terroir-vs-personal-preference-the-critics-dilemma/#sthash.56wdpnNQ.dpuf

I guess I more or less agree with Heimoff on this, but my overarching reaction is total exhaustion at yet another reiteration of the same issues that frame the whole issue of what makes for a good wine in a way that makes no sense whatsoever.

Wine scores and reviews: those who write them and those who need them

Wine Blog

http://www.wine-blog.org/index.php/2014/07/17/wine-scores-reviews-write-need/

This is a repost from 2006, but still totally relevant. It touches a lot of bases including how different tasters react differently to the same wine, as well as the difficulty of being a wine writer in general.

What Jane Goodall taught me about wine science

Erika Szymanski

http://palatepress.com/2014/07/wine/jane-goodall-taught-wine-science/

An interesting contemplation (for lack of a better word) on the low-tech things that make for good science as well as good winemaking. I don’t know if I agree with any of it, but I don’t know if I disagree with any of it either.

Another study agrees: We buy wine on price

Wine Curmudgeon

http://winecurmudgeon.com/another-study-agrees-we-buy-wine-on-price/

This title is a little misleading. It’s true that the largest single group is largely price conscious above other considerations, but there are plenty of others who gravitate in other directions. Nonetheless, this post is well worth reading.

For keeping up to date with what’s going on the in wine world, the best all around source is http://winebusiness.com.

Good Reads Wednesday

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

jeff-smby Jeff Miller of Artisan Family of Wines (Seven Artisans, Sly Dog Cellars, Red Côte)

Every Wednesday I post my recommendations of the best of last week’s postings concerning wine, whether blogs or news. I list them in the order I read them, so you shouldn’t infer anything about the order in which I list these posts.

I have been crazy busy this last week, which led me to miss this Monday’s post altogether. Sorry about that, and hopefully that dereliction will not recur.

3 Secrets of Successful Wine Social Media

by Liz Thach, Terry Lease, Gergely Szolnoki & Carsten Hoffmann

http://www.winebusiness.com/news/?go=getArticle&dataid=135492

The subject of this study is the use of social media to increase wine sales. Clearly, respondents to the survey believe social media works. However, since these results are based upon self reporting without any objective backup, they have to be considered somewhat suspect. Nonetheless, it is some evidence that social media actually works.

I love natural wine, but…

jamie goode’s wine blog

http://www.wineanorak.com/wineblog/natural-wine/i-love-natural-wine-but

Goode believes that any wine that fits this definition should be considered natural:

Organic/biodynamic viticulture
No added yeasts
No added acidity
No sulfur dioxide additions, except a bit at bottling if needed
No filtration

I don’t know about you, but I have a hard time believing that very many wines really meet this test. Nor should they. While I certainly subscribe to the notion that interventions should be kept to a minimum, I think it was Einstein who said that explanations of things should be kept as simple as possible, but no simpler. I think the same thing applies here. While interventions should be kept to the minimum possible, they should not be go any lower than that.

For keeping up to date with what’s going on the in wine world, the best all around source is http://winebusiness.com.

Good Reads Wednesday

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

jeff-smby Jeff Miller of Artisan Family of Wines (Seven Artisans, Sly Dog Cellars, Red Côte)

Every Wednesday I post my recommendations of the best of last week’s postings concerning wine, whether blogs or news. I list them in the order I read them, so you shouldn’t infer anything about the order in which I list these posts.

It took me about 5 minutes to go through everything and find nothing worth recommending. Sorry.

For keeping up to date with what’s going on the in wine world, the best all around source is http://winebusiness.com.

Good Reads Wednesday

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

jeff-smby Jeff Miller of Artisan Family of Wines (Seven Artisans, Sly Dog Cellars, Red Côte)

Every Wednesday I post my recommendations of the best of last week’s postings concerning wine, whether blogs or news. I list them in the order I read them, so you shouldn’t infer anything about the order in which I list these posts.

Eight stunning grower Champagnes

jamie goode’s wine blog

http://www.wineanorak.com/wineblog/champagne/eight-stunning-grower-champagnes

When I visited Champagne a number of years ago, I was blown away by the number of small Champagne houses producing incredibly good sparkling wines at about half the price of comparable product from the large houses. I don’t know if these recommendations are that good, but my guess is that they are.

For keeping up to date with what’s going on the in wine world, the best all around source is http://winebusiness.com.

Good Reads Wednesday

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

jeff-smby Jeff Miller of Artisan Family of Wines (Seven Artisans, Sly Dog Cellars, Red Côte)

Every Wednesday I post my recommendations of the best of last week’s postings concerning wine, whether blogs or news. I list them in the order I read them, so you shouldn’t infer anything about the order in which I list these posts.

No Wine, But Lots of Swill in This Study

Fermentation

http://fermentationwineblog.com/2014/06/wine-lots-swill-study/

This graphic is pretty depressing. Young people don’t drink much wine. Albeit, this is the 13-20 age group, so they should not really be drinking at all. And there’s hope for the future still.

What electric car patents and some AVAs have in common

Steve Heimoff

http://www.steveheimoff.com/index.php/2014/06/16/what-electric-car-patents-and-some-avas-have-in-common/#sthash.bSqtexl4.dpuf

Unfortunately, it’s really hard for a small AVA, and a small winery in a small AVA, to do much to get that AVA on the consumers’ radar.

Understanding sulfites’ role in wines

Wine Blog

http://www.wine-blog.org/index.php/2014/06/17/understanding-sulfites-role-wines/

I found this article on sulfur dioxide as a naturally occurring substance in wine really interesting, even if it was a bit on the technical side. It didn’t really change my understanding that sulfur dioxide occurs in small amounts in wine naturally, but I had not understood that it occurs due to the fermentation alone.

Uncorked! in Suisun Valley continues on June 21, 2014

Wine Blog

http://www.wine-blog.org/index.php/2014/06/12/uncorked-suisun-valley-continues-june-21-2014/

I was going to be pouring at this event, but unforeseen business requirements landed me in Los Angeles instead. By all reports, this event was a great success however.

Blind Tasting: Unreliable but Necessary

W. Blake Gray

http://palatepress.com/2014/06/wine/blind-tasting-unreliable-necessary/

It is something of a quandary. If you look at how blind tasting stands up to scientific evaluation, well, basically, it doesn’t. The same wine tasted on multiple occasions by different, or even the same, taster, will get wildly different scores. On the other hand, what is the case for non-blind tasting? Of course, scores will not be as erratic, because everybody knows that if they are tasting a Margaux, they are supposed to give it a high score. Damn how it tastes. Throw in the fact that wines can taste very differently bottle to bottle, and can be affected by such things as the mood of the taster, or the food that it is consumed with, and it is very hard to come to any hard and fast rule about how wines should be evaluated. Or, more accurately, that hard and fast rule is not just elusive, it simply does not exist.

The Release Of Your Wine Is Not “News”

1 Wine Dude

http://www.1winedude.com/the-release-of-your-wine-is-not-news/#more-13530

The graphic on this alone is humorous enough to justify reading the post.

Wine competitions and wine scores

The Wine Curmudgeon

http://winecurmudgeon.com/wine-competitions-wine-scores/

It’s kind of hypocritical to criticize wine competitions as being the charade that they are, and then go judge one. Which is the problem that the Wine Curmudgeon has here. But I’ve been in that predicament myself, so I sympathize.

Are we facing a cheap wine crisis?

The Wine Curmudgeon

http://winecurmudgeon.com/are-we-facing-a-cheap-wine-crisis/

Is the cheaper segment of the wine market going the way of Coca-Cola? That’s really the question that the Wine Curmudgeon asks. And it’s pretty hard not to conclude that the answer is “Yes”.

For keeping up to date with what’s going on the in wine world, the best all around source is http://winebusiness.com.